background

Location

The William Cecil is at Stamford in Lincolnshire (postcode: PE9 2LJ):

  • Birmingham Airport, 70 miles
  • Central London, 90 miles
  • Cambridge, 44 miles
  • A1, 1 mile
  • Stamford railway station (0.5 mile from the William Cecil) to London King's Cross, 90 minutes
  • Peterborough railway station (14 miles, 20 minutes' from the William Cecil) to London King's Cross, 60 minutes

Here's a sample of the amazing array of interesting things to do and places to visit in and around the beautiful and historic town of Stamford:

BURGHLEY HOUSE
Regarded by many as the finest Elizabethan House in England, Burghley House was built in the 16th Century by William Cecil, the first Lord Burghley. This stunning house, extensive grounds and sculpture park are open to the public over the summer period.
www.burghley.co.uk

BURGHLEY HORSE TRIALS
The Autumn 3-day event horse trials has been held on the Burghley Estate since 1961, making it the longest, continuous running international event.
www.burghley-horse.co.uk

ALL SAINTS BREWERY
Originally established in 1825 as a steam-operated brewery, it was restored in the late 1990's to produce specialised fruit beers from a micro-brewery known as Melbourn Bros. It has a coffee lounge, restaurant and brewery shop and is open for guided tours and tastings by pre-arrangement.

ALL SAINTS CHURCH
A striking building dating back to the 13th Century and rebuilt by the Brownes after suffering damage during the Wars of the Roses. Open daily.

BROWNE'S HOSPITAL
An almshouse founded in the late 15th Century to house 10 poor men and 2 poor women with a Warden and a Confrater, both of whom were to be priests in holy orders. Despite extensive 19th Century restorations much of the medieval stained glass, original furniture and archives remain. Open weekends and Bank Holidays May-September.

MID LENT FAIR
This fair dates back to King Edgar’s days some 1,000 years ago. Nowadays it is a huge funfair filling most of the town centre from Bath Row to the High Street on the Monday following Mothering Sunday through to the following Saturday, during March.

STAMFORD MEADOWS
Originally called the Water Meadows, the Meadows is a pleasant place to picnic, watch or feed the birds. It provides level walking along the River Welland, where you’ll find the Boudicea plaque, and is the starting point for the Jurassic Way. There are footpaths to Easton-on-the-Hill and Tinwell.

STAMFORD SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL AT TOLETHORPE HALL
A purpose-built auditorium in the landscaped grounds of the Elizabethan Tolethorpe Hall near Bourne provides the setting for the annual summer season of outdoor Shakespeare, which attracts 30,000 visitors a year. Prior to performances, theatregoers can dine in the Hall or picnic on the lawns. Tickets from Stamford Arts Centre.
www.stamfordshakespeare.co.uk

THE NENE VALLEY RAILWAY
The line once formed part of an important cross-country route from East Anglia to the Midlands, originally opened in 1845 and closed to passengers since 1966. All of the working locos rolling stock have been restored to enable you to enjoy a railway journey as it used to be.
www.nvr.org.uk

THE BARNSDALE GARDENS
The Barnsdale Gardens, familiar to millions of BBC2 viewers as the home of Geoff Hamilton and Gardeners' World, is open every day. There are 37 individual gardens and features linked by borders into one 8-acre garden.
www.barnsdalegardens.co.uk

See www.visitstamford.com for more ideas.

Media and Downloads

The William Cecil,
St Martins,


Stamford,
Lincolnshire,
United Kingdom
PE9 2LJ   |  01780 750 070